Astrophotography for the Amateur How to Use a Computerized Telescope Celestial Objects for Modern Telescopes Digital SLR Astrophotography


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Corrections, Updates, and Notes to the Second Edition


Actual corrections are in red.

(p. 16) Transferring files from one computer to another: One method I use is to copy them to a 32-GB SD card. However, the default file system (FAT32) will not accommodate files larger than 4 GB, so you must format the card as exFAT or NTFS instead (which also makes it faster). With exFAT there is a further problem that some Linux systems do not timestamp the files correctly when Daylight Saving Time is in effect. NTFS works reliably, but then the card cannot be used in digital cameras, only computers.

(p. 47) Nikon Manual Movie Settings: For "1/60" read "1/60 or 1/30."

This bug has not been fixed in D5300 firmware 1.01, 1.02, or 1.03. Manual Movie Settings still needs to be turned off when you are doing still photography with Live View.

(p. 82) Dark frames: When taking dark frames indoors, particularly for sensor testing, note that your lens cap may not be perfectly opaque to infrared light; also, a tiny amount of light can enter through the eyepiece. It is best to take dark frames in the dark.

(p. 161) Backlash: Celestron tells me there can easily be 60 arc-seconds of backlash in the gearbox (not the worm gear); this is normal, and no adjustment of the worm gear will affect it. They also say that when the mount is deliberately unbalanced for better tracking, it is acceptable for the unbalance to be so large that the telescope actually moves when brakes are released.

(p. 166) When autoguiding with a color camera, bin the pixels 2×2 if possible, to eliminate the Bayer matrix.

(p. 202) PixInsight dark frame optimization should not be used if the sensor has appreciable amp glow. It assumes the dark frames are genuinely dark.

(p. 308) Filter modification can bring out chromatic aberration in lenses. This point needs to be emphasized. With my Nikon 180/2.8 ED IF (non-AF) lens on a modified camera, the stars have bright red haloes. With some other lenses, it is necessary to "focus out" the red haloes, and the star images are not quite as compact as with an unmodified camera.


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Last revised 2018 September 2